Whale washed away in North Stradbroke Island

Whale washed away in North Stradbroke Island

In 2010 during winter 3012 whales were seen passing Point Lookout in North Stradbroke Island

Sadly, the largest mammal on earth, the Blue Whale could be completely extinct within this decade.
Their original population of 250,000 is now reduced to just a few hundred.
Marine biologists fear that the cacophony of undersea sounds emanating from ship engines, oil drilling and a variety of other sources may be interfering with their ability to communicate with each other over long distances making it difficult to find a mate.

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Pollution is also a cause of grave concern for the whales, all the poisons humans deposit into the oceans from engines, homes and factories are wreaking havoc on their environment. These toxic pollutants affect not only the whales and other sea creatures, but also the main sources of food they rely on for survival.

Many whales each year become entangled in fishing nets, and some countries like Japan and Norway still pursue whales for their by-products.
A major part of a whale’s diet is krill, and unfortunately the whales now have to compete with us for this vital food source! Krill is now harvested in bulk for sale in the supermarkets of Asia and the Pacific.

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During our weekend in Straddie Paul and I  always had breakfast while watching whales and dolphins near the shore. Sadly, very sadly, on Sunday, driving along Main beach we found this beached whale. It was the first time that I actually saw a beached whale, and tears came to my eyes. Apparently the whale got tangled in rope around her fin and came to shore, to die. Despite efforts of locals to bring the mammal back to the water, the whale was too injured and tired. It’s pretty impressive what a piece of rope could do to such a big animal!

 

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